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New edition of the Business Continuity and Resiliency Journal available

This issue contains five papers, all of which were short-listed for our recent Business Continuity Paper of the Year 2013 competition. The winning entry appears as the first paper.

Abstracts:

A FORK IN THE ROAD
Winner of the Business Continuity Paper of the Year 2013 competition

Author: Ken Simpson

Abstract: In 2013 we find ourselves at a collective fork in the road, once again considering the path we should collectively take to the future of the discipline. The current choice is between a wider-focused discipline called business continuity, and the 'management systems' highway known as business continuity management.

Moving forward may require embracing multiple alternative paths and destinations. To grow towards a wider focus we need to become a learning discipline. A wider focus on learning means we reflect on what we need to learn and how we facilitate that learning as a holistic discipline.

This paper discusses three ideas that challenge business continuity (management) professionals to think differently about learning, what it means to learn and ways that we can shape future practice.

THE BUSINESS CONTINUITY MANAGER IN 2017: HOW YOU CAN AVOID OBSOLESCE
Runner up in the Business Continuity Paper of the Year 2013 competition

Author: Charlie Maclean-Bristol

Abstract: As the business continuity landscape changes over time then the role of the business continuity manager will also have to change. This paper looks at what the typical tasks of the business continuity manager are today and contrasts them with what the tasks of the business continuity manager might be in 2017.

The paper also outlines the skills that the business continuity manager will have to acquire in order to thrive in this anticipated new environment.

THE RIGHT STUFF: DECISION MAKING IN A CRISIS
Third place in the Business Continuity Paper of the Year 2013 competition

Author: James E Lythe

Abstract: This paper examines the hypothesis that the pressures and behaviours exhibited in a crisis situation which affect decision making for an experienced emergency responder are identical or similar to the heightened level of stress of a business manager experiencing a crisis for the first time, even if the stimuli are different. If the hypothesis is true, then tools, techniques and coping mechanisms that have been developed within fields where crisis situations are common (the military, emergency services, high risk industries) can be usefully applied to fields where crisis situations are uncommon, but of significant impact (i.e. businesses).

The paper also looks at how stress functions in an individual and considers the tools that can be employed to manage and make decisions, even when under intense emotional stress.

UTILIZING BUSINESS CONTINUITY WHEN OTHER RISK TREATMENTS ARE NOT ADEQUATE

Author: Jayne Howe

Abstract: In the past businesses assumed that risk identification and priorization, risk treatment and ongoing risk management were all part of the business continuity process.
Now, many organizations realize that business continuity programs are in fact a unique and comprehensive risk treatment that overlays and complements all other risk treatments.

In this paper, the author examines where business continuity efforts can enhance and complement other risk treatments.

RISKS AND SCENARIOS VERSUS RESOURCES: WHY BOTHER WITH AN INFINITE UNKNOWN, WHEN YOU HAVE A FINITE KNOWN?

Author: Rainer Hübert

Abstract: Business continuity management systems should no longer be based on individual risks and scenarios but instead should focus on the identification and protection of critical resources. Whilst risks and scenarios are probabilistic, we can gain the knowledge and information about our resources with certainty.

If the organization is prepared to react properly to the loss of a critical resource, the organization is protected. Rather than working with the infinite unknown of the continuum of risks and scenarios, you now work with the finite and known continuum of the resources the organization makes use of.

This all-hazards approach is supported by ISO 22301 which is based on the principle of protecting organizations against any threat, regardless of its root cause.

To obtain the Business Continuity and Resiliency Journal, click here.

•Date: 11th April 2013 • World •Type: Article • Topic: Advanced BC

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